michael orlitzky

emacs-keys

get it

Most people will probably want the tarball of the latest release, emacs-keys-0.0.2.tar.xz. The latest version will always be kept in git.

What is it?

Two files that can be used to alter your keyboard layout, either in the system console or within X.org (or both):

This makes emacs (and any readline-based application) easier to use, I promise.

The console map probably only works on i386 qwerty keyboards, because that's all I have.

The files:

Installation

Either of those files can be loaded manually regardless of where they live; for example,

user $ loadkeys /path/to/console.map

user $ xmodmap /path/to/Xmodmap

The Makefile will install src/console.map to $(datadir)/emacs-keys by default. If you pass --enable-Xmodmap to the ./configure script, then the Makefile will install src/Xmodmap to the same location.

For the Xmodmap file, that's about as good as it gets. To use it, you will typically add something like the following to your ~/.xinitrc,

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emacsmodmap=/usr/share/emacs-keys/Xmodmap
if [ -f $emacsmodmap ]; then
  # It doesn't work unless you do it twice, don't ask me why.
  xmodmap $emacsmodmap
  xmodmap $emacsmodmap
fi

The console map on the other hand can be loaded by OpenRC, which starts a keymaps service at boot time. The configuration file for that service is usually located at /etc/conf.d/keymaps, and if you set, for example,

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extended_keymaps="/usr/share/emacs-keys/console.map"

in there, then OpenRC will load the emacs keymap on top of your default one when the system boots.